I'm a museum educator with an eye for paleontology, science history, animals and the occasional bit of pop culture nonsense. My long-winded blog is here.

 

zubat:

justbmarks:

Tiny Frog - Amazon Rainforest, Peru

This frog has absolutely no business being this tiny.

zubat:

justbmarks:

Tiny Frog - Amazon Rainforest, Peru

This frog has absolutely no business being this tiny.

grimchild:

Skeletal restoration by William D. Matthew from 1905, the first reconstruction of Tyrannosaurus rex ever published.  So I reconstructed it.  I’m pretty certain this is what T. rex actually looked like.

styrac:

lostbeasts:

royal tyrrell museum has some explaining to do

Absolutely awful reconstructions

What’s wrong with it? Anyone know the artist?

styrac:

lostbeasts:

royal tyrrell museum has some explaining to do

Absolutely awful reconstructions

What’s wrong with it? Anyone know the artist?

twofacedsheep:

A hybrid iguana; a cross between marine and land iguana.
Photographer:
Mauricio Handler/National Geographic Creative

twofacedsheep:

A hybrid iguana; a cross between marine and land iguana.

Photographer:

Mauricio Handler/National Geographic Creative

smithsonian3d:

We are getting ready to finish up T. rex 3D scanning! It has been such a magical experience. We’ll be letting this data run wild once we are finished processing and after the skeleton gets re-articulated. Keep a look out here for #3D @Smithsonian updates. Soon you can download and 3D print your very own Nation’s T. rex!

smithsonian3d:

We are getting ready to finish up T. rex 3D scanning! It has been such a magical experience. We’ll be letting this data run wild once we are finished processing and after the skeleton gets re-articulated. Keep a look out here for #3D @Smithsonian updates. Soon you can download and 3D print your very own Nation’s T. rex!

Meet a Mount: National Geographic Spinosaurus

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Taxon: Spinosaurus aegyptiacus

Specimen Number: Based on FSAC-KK 11888

Year Created: 2014

Dimensions: 49 feet long

Are we sick of Spinosaurus yet? As part of the colossal media blowout surrounding the Ibrahim et al. Spinosaurus reboot”, Research Casting International was commissioned to built a full-sized replica of the reimagined Spinosaurus skeleton (the skull was modeled by Acme design). The mount is the centerpiece of Spinosaurus: Lost Giant of the Cretaceous, which will go on tour after its debut run at the National Geographic Explorer’s Hall.

Much like their recent work on Alamosaurus at the Perot Museum, RCI’s new Spinosaurus is based on a digital composite. The new hindlimbs and pelvic girdle recovered by Ibrahim and colleagues were scanned and combined with scans of Spinosaurus fossils held in private collections, as well as reconstructions of the bones that were destroyed during World War II. Remaining gaps were filled in with bones from Spinosaurus relatives like Suchomimus. The resulting digital composite provides a unified vision of Spinosaurus, even though the material it is based on is stored thousands of miles apart. 

Using 3-D printers, RCI produced a life-sized model out of plastic and milled foam. This new technology doesn’t mean that dinosaurs are rolling off assembly lines, however: the skull alone reportedly cost $30,000 to produce. 

Meet a Mount: Tylosaurus at KU Natural History Museum

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Taxon: Tylosaurus proriger

Specimen Number: KUVP 5033

Dimensions: 45 feet long

Year Created: 1999

In 1911, C.D. Bunker uncovered in western Kansas one of the largest mosasaur specimens ever found. The fossils remained in storage at the University of Kansas Natural History Museum for nearly a century, until the rediscovery of Bunker’s field notes renewed interest in the historic find. The bones had fallen into disrepair, so the museum hired the private company Triebold Paleontology to restore them. Triebold also provided the museum with a complete replica of the skeleton, which now hangs over the three-story entrance hall. Unfortunately, capturing the entire coiled length of the 45-foot sea lizard seems to have eluded most photographers.

The original Tylosaurus fossils are held in the University of Kansas collections, but Triebold still offers casts in its catalog of replica fossil mounts. Examples can be seen at the Carnegie Museum of Natural History and the Dinosaur Resource Center in Woodland Park, Colorado.

Image Sources: 1, 2