I'm a museum educator with an eye for paleontology, science history, animals and the occasional bit of pop culture nonsense. My long-winded blog is here.

 

elletiburon:

sometimes when I’m angry or stressed or sad I think about whales just swimming around in the ocean, doing whale shit. like, they’re the biggest goddamn mammals on the planet. they don’t have time for little problems. there’s too much chill-ass whale shit to do.
basically what I am saying is that whales are my happy place.

elletiburon:

sometimes when I’m angry or stressed or sad I think about whales just swimming around in the ocean, doing whale shit. like, they’re the biggest goddamn mammals on the planet. they don’t have time for little problems. there’s too much chill-ass whale shit to do.

basically what I am saying is that whales are my happy place.

(Source: p4cifc)

jurassiraptor:

ComicCon: No Jurassic World footage shown; King Kong and Godzilla to return

Legendary Entertainment finished their panel at San Diego Comic Con this afternoon without a teaser, footage, or mention of Jurassic World.

Dinosaur/monster movie fans were given a taste of other future productions though. Skull Island, based on the world and prehistoric island home of King Kong, was announced and is scheduled for release in November 2016.

Additionally it was announced that not only will Gareth Edwards return to direct Godzilla 2, but classic Toho monsters Rodan, Mothra, and Ghidorah will also feature in the movie, due in theaters in December 2016.

Meh on more Legenzilla, but OMG SKULL ISLAND.

Pop quiz: which T. rex specimens are these casts at the Maryland Science Center taken from?

Pop quiz: which T. rex specimens are these casts at the Maryland Science Center taken from?

centuriespast:

The Artist in His Museum
Charles Willson Peale (1741-1827)
1822
Oil on canvas
Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts 

centuriespast:

The Artist in His Museum

Charles Willson Peale (1741-1827)

1822

Oil on canvas

Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts 

asylum-art:

The Incredible Scrap Metal Animal Sculptures of John Lopez

Sculptor John Lopez was born and raised on a ranch in Western South Dakota. In the midst of a successful career in bronze sculpting, Lopez discovered an exciting new direction: scrap iron sculpting.

“I am never bored! I look forward to each new creation, and it is helping me grow and develop as an artist,” he says. As he John explains on his website.

evaporites:

dino-sours:

Know Your T. rex!

There are dozens of Tyrannosaurus skeletons on display around the world, but most are casts of a handful of specimens.

AMNH 5027

The first T. rex ever exhibited, and for most of the 20th century the only nearly complete specimen known. Look for a boxier skull, oversized legs borrowed from the T. rex holotype, feet based on Allosaurus, and filled-in fenestrae on older casts.

As Seen At: American Museum of Natural History, Denver Museum of Nature and Science, Academy of Natural Sciences, National Museum of Natural History (skull), Peabody Museum of Natural History (skull)

The Nation’s T. rex - MOR 555

Discovered by rancher Kathy Wankel on Army Corps of Engineers land. Currently on loan to the Smithsonian. Look for longer, lankier legs, and an inaccurately reconstructed sloped snout on cast skulls.

As Seen At: Royal Ontario Museum, Museum of the Rockies, National Museum of Scotland, Perot Museum of Nature and Science, National Museum of Natural History (in 2019)

Stan – BHI 3033

By far the most duplicated and most exhibited dinosaur in the world. Look for excessively long teeth and a perforated jaw.

As Seen At: Black Hills Institute, Children’s Museum of Indianapolis, National Museum of Natural History, Dinosaur Discovery Museum, Houston Museum of Natural Science, Manchester Museum, Tokyo National Museum of Natural Science, traveling exhibits

Sue – FMNH PR2081

Discovered by Susan Hendrickson and the subject of an ugly 3-year legal battle before being purchased by the Field Museum. The oldest and most complete T. rex known. Look for a longer snout and stubby cocker spaniel legs.

As Seen At: Field Museum of Natural History, Disney World Animal Kingdom, traveling exhibits

Jane – BMRP 2002.4.1

A juvenile Tyrannosaurus discovered in 2001. Look for a scrawny build, gracile legs and a narrow skull.

As Seen At: Burpee Museum of Natural History, Carnegie Museum of Natural History, Natural History Museum of Los Angeles County

Also need to talk about RTMP 81.6.1 “Black Beauty” (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Specimens_of_Tyrannosaurus#.22Black_Beauty.22:_RTMP_81.6.1) and my cuddle baby the Huxley Tyrannosaur (RTMP 81.12.1)

(Big ol’ list of Rexes: https://www.bhigr.com/pages/info/rex_chart.htm)

The Royal Tyrell Museum rexes are totally rad, but I didn’t include them because they’re not widely replicated! AFAIK there’s only one complete copy of Black Beauty (in Stockholm), and the original RTMP 81.12.1 mount is the only one on display. It’s also filled in with lots of AMNH 5027 casts, including the skull.

Smackdown: Supersaurus vs. Giraffatitan and Diplodocus

(Source: skeletaldrawing)

mucholderthen:

AMAZING DOPPLER RADAR IMAGE:FROM OUT OF THE MISSISSIPPI, MAYFLIES EMERGE TO MATE AND DIE
Via evolutionary biologist Jerry Coyne's Why Evolution Is True blog [July 22, 2014]
What you’re seeing is a Doppler radar loop from the Lacrosse, Wisconsin office of the National Weather Service.  
What the radar saw for 90 minutes was a massive mayfly emergence on June 23.
Probably the giant mayfly, Hexagenia limbata.

On Saturday evening, June 23 2012, a massive mayfly emergence occurred along the Mississippi River beginning just after 9 pm. By late evening, mayflies were swarming in La Crosse, La Crescent, and points up and down the river. While the emergence of mayflies from their river bottom mud dwelling can occur at various times through the warm season, this particular event was one of the best seen on radar yet. 
In the radar time lapse loop from 9 pm to just after 1030 pm, the yellows and oranges indicate a large magnitude of airborne mayflies. 

Go here to see another amazing radar loop showing part of this swarm of mayflies being carried off by the wind at altitudes as high as 3000 feet!
More information [as well as images] at the La Crosse National Weather Service site …

mucholderthen:

AMAZING DOPPLER RADAR IMAGE:
FROM OUT OF THE MISSISSIPPI, MAYFLIES EMERGE TO MATE AND DIE

Via evolutionary biologist Jerry Coyne's Why Evolution Is True blog [July 22, 2014]

  • What you’re seeing is a Doppler radar loop from the Lacrosse, Wisconsin office of the National Weather Service.  
  • What the radar saw for 90 minutes was a massive mayfly emergence on June 23.
  • Probably the giant mayfly, Hexagenia limbata.

On Saturday evening, June 23 2012, a massive mayfly emergence occurred along the Mississippi River beginning just after 9 pm. By late evening, mayflies were swarming in La Crosse, La Crescent, and points up and down the river. While the emergence of mayflies from their river bottom mud dwelling can occur at various times through the warm season, this particular event was one of the best seen on radar yet.

In the radar time lapse loop from 9 pm to just after 1030 pm, the yellows and oranges indicate a large magnitude of airborne mayflies.

Go here to see another amazing radar loop showing part of this swarm of mayflies being carried off by the wind at altitudes as high as 3000 feet!

More information [as well as images] at the La Crosse National Weather Service site …

Know Your T. rex!

There are dozens of Tyrannosaurus skeletons on display around the world, but most are casts of a handful of specimens.

AMNH 5027

The first T. rex ever exhibited, and for most of the 20th century the only nearly complete specimen known. Look for a boxier skull, oversized legs borrowed from the T. rex holotype, feet based on Allosaurus, and filled-in fenestrae on older casts.

As Seen At: American Museum of Natural History, Denver Museum of Nature and Science, Academy of Natural Sciences, National Museum of Natural History (skull), Peabody Museum of Natural History (skull)

The Nation’s T. rex - MOR 555

Discovered by rancher Kathy Wankel on Army Corps of Engineers land. Currently on loan to the Smithsonian. Look for longer, lankier legs, and an inaccurately reconstructed sloped snout on cast skulls.

As Seen At: Royal Ontario Museum, Museum of the Rockies, National Museum of Scotland, Perot Museum of Nature and Science, National Museum of Natural History (in 2019)

Stan – BHI 3033

By far the most duplicated and most exhibited dinosaur in the world. Look for excessively long teeth and a perforated jaw.

As Seen At: Black Hills Institute, Children’s Museum of Indianapolis, National Museum of Natural History, Dinosaur Discovery Museum, Houston Museum of Natural Science, Manchester Museum, Tokyo National Museum of Natural Science, traveling exhibits

Sue – FMNH PR2081

Discovered by Susan Hendrickson and the subject of an ugly 3-year legal battle before being purchased by the Field Museum. The oldest and most complete T. rex known. Look for a longer snout and stubby cocker spaniel legs.

As Seen At: Field Museum of Natural History, Disney World Animal Kingdom, traveling exhibits

Jane – BMRP 2002.4.1

A juvenile Tyrannosaurus discovered in 2001. Look for a scrawny build, gracile legs and a narrow skull.

As Seen At: Burpee Museum of Natural History, Carnegie Museum of Natural History, Natural History Museum of Los Angeles County

Meet a Mount: AMNH Tyrannosaurus

Taxon: Tyrannosaurus rex

Specimen Number: AMNH 5027

Year Created: 1915 (original), 1995 (remount)

Dimensions: 38 feet

How have I not done this one yet? The American Museum of Natural History Tyrannosaurus rex mount is no less than an icon. It was the first mounted T. rex ever built, and has been a destination attraction in New York for longer than the Empire State Building. Constructed by Adam Hermann, the original mount combined the original fossils of a specimen discovered by Barnum Brown in 1908 with a cast of the pelvis and legs of the 1905 T. rex holotype. Missing portions of the skeleton, including the arms, feet, and most of the tail, were sculpted based on Allosaurus fossils. When the Tyrannosaurus was unveiled in 1915, it was akin to a mythical dragon made real. A front page article in the New York Times was heavy with hyperbole, declaring the dinosaur “the prize fighter of antiquity”, “the king of all kings in the domain of animal life,” “the absolute warlord of the earth” and “the most formidable fighting animal of which there is any record whatsoever.”

In 1993, AMNH commissioned Phil Fraley Productions to restore and remount the classic Tyrannosaurus. The new mount not only corrected the dinosaur’s posture, but improved visitors’ view of the fossils by replacing vertical supports with steel cables suspending the skeleton from the ceiling. Regrettably, the new mount did not replace the legs, which are too large for the rest of the body, or the feet, which are now known to be much too robust for a tyrannosaur.

Historic photo courtesy of AMNH Research Library.